Homegoings

Homegoings

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Homegoings (2013)

Opened: 06/24/2013 Limited

Limited06/24/2013
Maysles Cinema06/24/2013 - 06/30/20137 days

Trailer: Click for trailer

Websites: Twitter, Facebook

Genre: Documentary

Rated: Unrated

Through the eyes of funeral director Isaiah Owens, the beauty and grace of African American funerals are brought to life.

Synopsis

Isaiah Owens is the quintessential self-made man. The son of a sharecropper, he grew up among people who made their living picking cotton. When a loved one died, he says, relatives "would sign a promissory note that when the cotton is ready this year, that they would come back and pay. The black funeral director wound up being a friend, somebody in the community that was stable, appeared to have means."

But neither Owens nor his mother, Willie Mae, who today works as a receptionist at his other funeral parlor in Branchville, S.C., can completely account for the Owens' fascination with burials, even as a boy.

When Owens was five, he buried a matchstick and put flowers on top of the soil. After that he progressed to burying "frogs...chickens; I buried the mule that died. I buried the neighbor's dog, and the dog's name was Snowball." Willie Mae says with a smile, "Anything that he find dead, he buried. Can't even think where he got it from...But that was his calling."

In 1968, this calling took 17-year-old Owens to New York City, where he learned his craft. A few years later, he opened what would become one of Harlem's most popular funeral homes, with a largely Baptist clientele. Today, Owens' wife, Lillie, works with him, but Owens remains the most constant presence. When he is dressing and beautifying the dead, he shows a dedication to craft and attention to detail that exemplifies Owens Funeral Home's motto: "Where Beauty Softens Your Grief." When talking with bereaved families, he is entirely focused on the members' individual needs.

Homegoings introduces some of Owens' customers, who express a mix of grief, humor and celebration. Linda "Redd" Williams-Miller, for instance, jovially plans her own funeral down to the last detail, including the exact shade of her namesake color to be used for her nails and hair. The children of Queen Petra are unsure how to honor their mother's multicultural legacy, until Owens suggests there's no reason they can't have a parade, led by a white horse and carriage, down the very block where their mother was a street vendor. Owens commiserates with Walter Simons, whose grandmother's passing turns into a double funeral when his grandfather dies just two days later. They share the sorrow and joy in knowing that two people could be so connected by love. Williams-Miller describes the African-American funeral this way: "Homegoing. A happy occasion...going home to be at peace...You're going home to meet the ones that went on before you and they're there waiting for you."

Throughout Homegoings, Owens relates the culture and history of death and mourning in the black community, harkening back to slavery and segregation. He explains that "when the slaves were killed...it wasn't a proper funeral, but they kind of did their best. . . . When they got down in the woods, away from the slave masters..they came up with songs like 'Soon I will be done with the troubles of the world, going home to live with my God.'" He recalls that when he was growing up in the South, the funeral director was a lifeline for the community: "Whenever somebody got sick, they would call Mr. Bird at the funeral home, and then he would ride out in the country to tell my mother, 'Such and such one is real sick in Philadelphia,' and...'your sister called.'"

Owens recalls more recent history, too, from an era when Harlem was full of mom-and-pop funeral homes, each with a loyal clientele, "but since '68 I probably could count at least 20 or 25 funeral homes that have gone out of business." He also notes another trend: In the 1980s many of the departed were victims of violence or AIDS, whereas today people are dying of heart problems or stroke. Owens routinely receives invitations to sell his establishment to bigger companies, but he always turns them down. "I'm trying to create a business that could take care of my family for maybe the next hundred, 200 years," he explains. In doing so, he is also carrying forward a legacy--dating back more than a century--of the black funeral director as a pillar of the community.

Cast Biography

Isaiah Owens (Subject) is a funeral director in Harlem with over 40 years of experience. Originally from South Carolina, Mr. Owens moved to New York in 1968 to train as a mortician at the age of 17. In addition to being recognized as a superb embalmer and restorative artist, he has since earned a number of awards for his contributions to the community. Along with his wife Lillie, he runs Owens Funeral Home, "where beauty softens your grief."

Filmmaker Biographies

Christine Turner (Director/Producer) is an independent filmmaker based in New York. As a researcher and producer, she has contributed to numerous documentaries for PBS, HBO and OWN, working with Bill Moyers, Lisa Ling, Stanley Nelson and others. Her short fiction films have screened at the Tribeca Film Festival, San Francisco International Film Festival and on PBS. She was born and raised in San Francisco and received a BFA in film and television from the Tisch School of the Arts, New York University.

Marshall Stief (Cinematographer) is a New York-based cinematographer who shoots on both film and video. In addition to his commercial work for clients such as Citibank, Johnson & Johnson and Sotheby's, he has lensed a variety of documentaries and non-fiction television series for the likes of History Channel, Bravo and Food Network.

Sonejuhi Sinha (Editor) is a New York-based editor with the international company Final Cut, where she's edited high profile music videos and awardwinning ad campaigns, such as "Keep A Child Alive," winner of two Gold Lions at Cannes. Working alongside directors as diverse as Harmony Korine, Julie Taymor and Mike Maguire, she easily alternates between the commercial, narrative and non-fiction worlds.

Daniel Roumain's (Composer) acclaimed work as a composer and a performer has spanned more than two decades, and has been commissioned by venerable artists and institutions worldwide. Proving that he's "about as omnivorous as a contemporary artist gets" (New York Times), Roumain is perhaps the only composer whose collaborations span the worlds of Philip Glass, Bill T. Jones and Lady Gaga.

 

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